motherhood

Brave Souls

We brave souls. 

For a few minutes we slip off the masks and unbuckle the armor. We step out and onto the illuminated stage, giving voice to our words. Purposeful, brave and bold, we tell our truths while above us paper lanterns dance to our pulsing vibrato. The sound of language gives texture and richness to our written stories now shared with eager ears in a tiny auditorium at Writers and Books during the 2017 Rochester Fringe Festival. 

A single voice rising, lilting, rushing, and then delivering silence so the audience can feel our brave moment. This intimacy of here and now demands a synchrony of attention that written words cannot duplicate. 

As I read my story Tangled In Leather the words made me relive the heartbreak and hope I felt battling infertility – my nose fizzed, my eyes filled with tears. As I listened to each of my fellow cast mates and Listen to Your Mother (LTYM) alums read her own story, I circled from laughter to tears, from joy to sadness, and saw resilience shine again and again:

Alone in her room (Robin L. Flanigan)

The 10 Things That Will Likely Keep Me From Winning “Mother of the Year”  (Xavia Omega)

Sacred Assembly (Maria DiTullio)

Glass Slippers (Christine Lasher) 

Laid to Rest (Stacey Freed)

Mom’s Oxtails (Raquel Walker)

Mother, Technology and Me (Mary Finucane) 

We brave souls came together to share our unique experiences about motherhood and left with gifts of understanding, respect, and connection.     

I take comfort in knowing I am not alone in my journey as a mother, a woman, a human being. I know what it’s like to be vulnerable, real and raw. Sometimes it’s a little scary to walk the line; to be uncomfortable with uncertainty. I believe we are born to live and feel every moment.

We are brave. 

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This is my best work today. Thanks for reading. If you like this post, please feel free to share it with your friends or send me a comment. You can also post a comment on my blog or Facebook, or tweet me @kristinebruneau.

Rochester Fringe Festival Features Listen to Your Mother: Mama Said

This year’s Key Bank Rochester Fringe Festival ushers in heartfelt stories about the humor, messiness, joys, sorrows, and wisdom that motherhood brings with LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER: Mama Said.

I’m excited to share that I will join the cast of eight women who will share stories of motherhood at Writers & Books for two hour-long performances: Thursday September 14 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, September 16 at 2 p.m.

There are only 60 seats per show, so buy your tickets online today!

For anyone unfamiliar with the Rochester Fringe Festival (aka Fringe), it is a bawdy fusion of visual and performing artists from near and far who sing, dance, and play for the sake of having a shared community experience.

Rochester’s East End (corner of Gibbs and Main Streets) is transformed into the throbbing heart of the Fringe with live, outdoor performances at the pop up urban lounge Spiegelgarden, and the magical Spiegeltent. The festival’s footprint extends to the Neighborhood of the Arts, which includes Writers & Books, School of the Arts, MuCC, and arts and cultural outliers George Eastman Museum, Central Library and the Rochester Museum and Science Center’s Strasenburgh Planetarium.

More than 500 events will be held at 25 venues throughout the 10 day affair. Some events are free, others require a ticket. Check out RochesterFringe.com for all the details.

I hope to see you at the Fringe!

What do you think?

This is my best work today. Thanks for reading. If you like this post, please feel free to share it with your friends or send me a comment. You can also post a comment on my blog or Facebook, or tweet me @kristinebruneau.

Letting go of my teenager

Holding my child close is easier than letting go of my teenager. 

Once upon a time, there was a planet called James who lived in the solar system of Fun. At the center of this universe was a twin star called The Parents, shining love to nurture and help Planet James grow strong, brave and happy. The weather on this little planet was active. Mostly sunny conditions could change without warning into something dark, foul and boisterous. While maddening, these storms were temporary and essential to the little planet’s growth — something The Parents needed to remind themselves of from time to time. 

Over the years, Planet James orbited The Parents and frolicked with other friendly planets, cosmic cousins and dog stars. There were many moons of celebration. Interstellar visitors were always welcome; the universal language was Play. When Planet James broke the rules set by the Parents, there were squalls of Time Outs and No Play Dates, but these were temporary. Crashing into the little planet were the occasional meteors of doubt, fear, uncertainty, sadness and disappointment. Although unavoidable, Planet James learned to understand and negotiate these collisions with help from The Parents and other bright stars of enlightenment

Every day the weather is different on Planet James.  Some are stormy, others are bright. Some days The Parents hover too close, which makes Planet James angry. Other days Planet James wants them near.

As the little planet grows and matures, it begins its transformational journey into the next stage of life. The Parents continue to stay involved; communicating, setting limits, and always shining love upon Planet James.

Letting go is hard.

There are days that I miss my little planet and his solar system of Fun. Now I am witness to the crossover from youth to adulthood. A coming of age. A hero’s journey

As a mom I still want to give my child advice, teach him not to fear suffering, encourage him to follow his bliss, and support him during his journey. It’s a delicate balance of push and pull.

Holding my child close is easier than letting go of the teenager.

In the end I have to trust myself and believe I did the best I could as a mom. He’s on his way.

What do you think?

This is my best work today. Thanks for reading. If you like this post, please feel free to share it with your friends or send me a comment. You can also post a comment on my blog or Facebook, or tweet me @kristinebruneau.